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1,000 Pieces Of Disney to be Auctioned As Collector Sells Home!

Scott Rummell, a Disney collector, recently sold his four-bedroom Yorba Linda house, which he and his wife, Terry, spent 23 years turning into their own “happiest place on Earth.”

Various ride cars, hand-silkscreened attraction posters, and other items from the 25,000-piece Disneyland and Walt Disney World’s Magic Kingdom series infuse playfulness into nearly every corner of the 4,569-square-foot home. But none of it comes with the home, which sold for $2.24 million with several offers only six days after going on the market on April 23.

On May 17, it sold for 12% more than the asking price.

“I didn’t want to make it so kitschy that a family couldn’t move in with whatever their own spin on this house is,” says Rummell, a Hollywood voice-over talent who plans to relocate the bulk of the collection to a new primary residence in Dana Point.”

In December, he plans to sell 1,000 pieces at a two-day exhibition and sale at Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, which he expects to bring in at least $2 million.

“The biggest sale, where a guy like me sold a whole house full of Disney memorabilia in two days for around $7 million, he says. I’ll be pleased if I accomplish half of that.”

All the big stuff, including four antique ride vehicles seen during a recent tour of the Yorba Linda house, is going to auction. A Super Jets rocket, an Autopia racer motorcycle, and a Mr. Toad’s Wild Ride buggy from Magic Kingdom have two rows of seats instead of one at Disneyland.

Another is the Skyway gondola, which is identical to one that recently sold for $600,000 at auction.

A 70-pound Monstro the Whale tooth, a “Pirates of the Caribbean” pinball machine, and handpainted attraction signs once attached to the side of the Disneyland Omnibus share space in the upstairs bonus room with the gondola. Hundreds of narrow pointed flags cover a plank ceiling, including a 1955 Disneyland opening day pennant.

Various props from movies whose trailers Rummell has dubbed in that rich, resonant style he so effortlessly falls into as he leads visitors through the house are also on show. He still uses his announcer voice, which he used briefly as the Voice of Disneyland in the early 1990s.

He doesn’t usually talk in this manner.

Rummell, a lifelong Disney fan, started amassing his collection after marrying his Donald Duck collector wife in the early 1980s. From a Main Street USA living room to a formal dining room inspired by the Mark Twain Riverboat and Sailing Ship Columbia, which Rummell’s grandfather helped construct, the pieces establish distinct Disney themes in their longtime home.

The look of a bathroom in the workspace house addition, near Rummell’s office and glassed-in studio, was influenced by Walt Disney’s Enchanted Tiki Room.

He plans to move a Mickey Mouse recording light above the studio to Dana Point, where a new studio is being built.

“Can you imagine the voice talents that have walked underneath that light? I always think of that whenever I’m in my studio,” he says.

A brick-covered passageway to the kitchen is adorned with Haunted Mansion plaques.

From Club 33 to Plaza Gardens, the open and airy kitchen blends various Disney restaurants. Over the dining room doorway, an original Club 33 foiled glass sign stands.

It was one of three made in the early days of Club 33, according to Rummell.

The adjacent Disney train room is jam-packed with railroad memorabilia, including bells and wheels. A model train circled a tunnel painted within a Grand Canyon Diorama mural and passed by a house with a miniature Walt Disney looking out the window from above.

It’s one of the resort’s many hidden Mickeys.

Behind a hidden entrance, an old-fashioned movie theater evokes Main Street Cinema.

The luxurious Disney Dream Suite is located up the stairwell, which features replica Mark Twain Riverboat handrails. A glass door leads to a balcony with Carnation Plaza Gardens-inspired ironwork.

A resort-style backyard with a half basketball court, an in-ground trampoline, and a swimming pool with a waterfall and waterslide is visible from the balcony. Another Hidden Mickey is a Mickey Mouse topiary next to the waterfall.

He takes a few moments.

“We should move on before I start crying.”

Listing agent Casey Brookman of Paul Kott Realtors, Inc. represented the Rummells. The buyer was portrayed by Sung Won Byun of New Star Realty and Investment.

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